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Houston Storms Could Delay Rebuilding Efforts. Here’s What We Know

Houston Storms Could Delay Rebuilding Efforts. Here’s What We Know

With many people in the Houston area still without power Thursday, three days after Hurricane Beryl made landfall in Texas, restoration efforts will continue through the end of the week and likely into the weekend. Unfortunately, a stalled front could lead to a slower recovery response as storm risks increase.

If you live south of Houston, chances are you got some rain Wednesday, thanks to a combination of a nearby frontal boundary and daytime thunderstorms taking advantage of daytime warming. More of us could get a refreshing shower Thursday.

That’s because the boundary is going to move closer to the Interstate 10 corridor. We’ll see a regeneration of thunderstorms in the afternoon and evening on Thursday in the Houston metro area. Rain chances between 40% and 60% are expected through Friday. North of Houston, those chances could be a little lower. South of Houston, due to the proximity of the sea breeze, daily rain chances could be a little higher.

Rainfall is expected to remain light, but any prolonged downpours could slow utility crews trying to restore power. Thunderstorms that form during the day are expected to move out after 30 minutes to an hour, keeping utility crews from falling behind schedule.

Daytime temperatures are expected to remain near average through the weekend, although the National Weather Service will extend heat advisories warning of an elevated risk of heat-related illness as many people continue to be without power. Daily highs of 91 to 94 degrees are expected, with afternoon heat index values ​​of 100 to 105.

By next week, more heat could settle into southeast Texas as a ridge of high pressure settles overhead. High pressure causes lower air and warmer temperatures, so daytime highs could climb even higher, up to 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

Whatever happens in this watch area, it won’t affect Texas. Over the next two weeks, it looks like the Atlantic basin will remain quiet, thanks to Saharan dust outbreaks.